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A factorial design was used, with around 7500 patients randomly allocated to receive aspirin tablets versus 7500 patients allocated to receive matching placebo tablets (see figure below). Similarly, around 7500 patients were separately randomised to receive omega-3 FA capsules versus 7500 patients allocated to receive placebo capsules. The primary analyses will involve two-way comparisons of all those allocated aspirin versus all those allocated matching placebo tablets, irrespective of the omega-3 FA allocation (subtotal A versus subtotal B), and of all those allocated omega-3 FA versus all those allocated matching placebo capsules irrespective of the aspirin allocation (i.e. subtotal 1 versus subtotal 2). Hence, reliable assessment of the effects of aspirin will not interfere with reliable assessment of omega-3 FA (or vice versa), as outcomes among all those allocated active aspirin can still be compared with those among all those allocated placebo aspirin (even though half of each group will have received omega-3 FA). Use of such a factorial design instead of a simple 2-way design has little or no effect on the statistical sensitivity with which the overall effects can be assessed, or on the total number of patients required in the study[1].

 


Figure: Factorial design of ASCEND

More detailed information about the study can be found in the Protocol


  1. Peto R, Pike MC, Armitage P, et al. Design and analysis of randomized clinical trials requiring prolonged observation of each patient. Part II: Analysis and examples. Br J Cancer 1977;35:1-39